This quilt repair project was completed before Easter; its taken a while to get back to the blog.  So sorry!  We had so much rain in March that i was never able to take a good full-sized photo outside.

This pieced top is in the Tumbling Blocks pattern, somewhat of an optical illusion.  The solid color squares on point are either the tops of the blocks, or the bottoms.  When this quilt came to me it needed a new back (see the march 22 post for how i made a “window” to reveal the embroidered historical information), new binding, and one row of diamonds had many holes in the fabric.

Binding:  when i first looked at the binding, it appeared to be white, being the back fabric folded over to the front edge.  However, when i removed it, i discovered blue color in the folded corners.  I still went with the lighter weight muslin on the back, but decided to replace the binding with blue cotton.

Another discovery was the debris that fell out of the batting when i removed the old binding.  These little bits and pieces of organic matter are from the cotton bolls – this material, from the 1930’s, was not especially clean.  Very common for the time period and location (rural TN).

 The third repair that i did was to put 40 new patches over 1 row of damaged fabric.  It is the white with large orange, purple, and black flowers below.  In older fabrics, often the black dyes have mineral salts in them that eventually eat through the fibers.  Instead of patching over 40 holes, i opted to cover the row with another fabric.  When i cannot find a vintage fabric that is similar in pattern, i select one that is from the same time period and blends well with the quilt.

The owner had a hard time figuring out which row had been replaced!  And she’s had this quilt for over 50 years.

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